3 Ways to Earn Extra Income as a Freshman in College
LaTisha Styles

As a college student, it’s easy to be strapped for cash. At this point in your life, the goal is to get an education. That requires late nights, study time, and of course, the occasional evening out, right? But just because you are a college student, that does not mean that you have to be the stereotypical broke college student.

Earning extra income in college can do more than provide you with some extra spending money. With extra income, you could save more so that you have a small nest egg at graduation. You could also use the extra income to help pay for college. And, depending on the method you choose, some of that extra income could go directly towards your tuition and fees. With that in mind, here are 3 ways to earn extra income as a freshman in college and still have enough time to study.

Work on Campus

If transportation is a concern and you simply cannot leave campus to find a job, then you can work on campus. Most colleges have a work study program. That program might be needs-based and run through the financial aid office. However, if you do not qualify for a needs based program, you can still apply for the part time jobs that are available on campus.

As a freshman, you might not know exactly what you want your major to be, but you can try out different departments to help you figure it out.

In most cases, you will be working a front desk or taking phone calls. All of that experience is helpful when you choose a major. And between daily tasks at work, you may have time to actually study. In this case, working on campus provides a way for you to better manage your time outside of the classroom.

In general, campus jobs pay minimum wage, so you might not make as much as if you were to leave campus to work. However, the advantage of working on campus is that you can go directly from class to work without a nasty commute.

Earn Merit Based Income

How about earning income just for being a star student? If your best talent is getting excellent grades, then you may qualify for merit based income. To find these grants, start with your college financial aid office. Often, there are college-specific grants provided by alumni or organizations that are friendly to the school.

Beyond that, you can check with organizations that you were a part of in high school or organizations where your parents participate. And finally, look to state organizations or corporations.

Merit based grants can be competitive but that should not stop you from trying.

Get a Part-Time Job

If an hourly wage is what you seek, consider getting a part time job. Working at a restaurant might not be what you consider as a long term option if your degree is in accounting, but those part time jobs could actually lead to a permanent position.

The key here is to become a well-rounded candidate. Working in a retail position polishes your sales skills, working at a restaurant improves your ability to manage your time, and almost all part time jobs flex your patience muscles.

If you’re looking for a part time job that pays a bit more, look into becoming a brand ambassador. These jobs are contract positions and require little to no experience. Your job is to stand at a booth or pop up stand and pass out samples or encourage passersby to sign up for the current day promotion. These brand ambassador gigs pay anywhere from $15 to $20 an hour which is pretty good when you’re in college.

And finally, look for a job where you could earn tips. Sometimes, the tips from working at a restaurant could put you at the $15 to $20 an hour range.

Choose one or all of these methods to earn extra income. Be sure to reserve time for your studies and the important social activities that make college worth every moment. With these 3 methods, you can shrug off the expectation that you must be a broke college student.

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