Theme: All About Me

Trace Your Face


Objective: Children will name their facial features and recognize their uniqueness as they trace their faces on a mirror.

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What You Will Need

  • 6”–8” Mirrors – 1 per child
  • Repositionable contact paper – 1 roll (available inexpensively at office supply stores)
  • Thin tip permanent markers – 1 per child

What To Do

Note: Before beginning the lesson, cover each mirror with clear contact paper. The children will be writing directly on the contact paper.

  1. Begin a discussion with the children about their faces (see Did You Know).
  2. Explain the term facial features (see Vocabulary) to the children and have them point to specific features as you discuss them.
  3. Demonstrate how they will be using a mirror to trace their reflections with a marker.
  4. Distribute mirrors and markers.
  5. Guide the children through tracing the outline of their faces and each facial feature. Encourage them to name each feature as they trace.
  6. Carefully remove the contact paper and display the self-portraits in the classroom.

Guiding Student Inquiry

  • Tell me about the parts of your face that you see in the mirror.
  • Describe how your tracing looks like you.
  • Explain how your face is the same as/different than other faces.

Explore, Extend and Integrate

  • Sing and dramatize the song, Head, Shoulders, Knees and Toes.
  • Discuss the self-portraits; what does everyone have that is the same? How many noses, eyes, or mouths are there altogether?
  • Make mirrors and erasable markers available in the science or art center for further exploration.

Check for Children’s Understanding

  • Could children trace their faces?
  • Could children name the features of their faces?
  • Could children describe how the self-portraits are similar? Different?

Did You Know?

Each person’s face is unique and includes several distinct features. We have a forehead, two eyes, a nose, mouth, cheeks, and a chin. Our faces distinguish us and make us recognizable. The face is a highly sensitive organ and is easily affected by emotion and our other senses.

Learn More »


Vocabulary

  • face
  • feature
  • trace
  • mirror
  • reflection
  • self-portrait

Child-Friendly Definitions »


Common Core State
Standards Initiative

These lessons are aligned with the Common Core State Standards ("CCSS"). The CCSS provide a consistent, clear understanding of the concepts and skills children are expected to learn and guide teachers to provide their students with opportunities to gain these important skills and foundational knowledge.**

Learn More »

Did You Know?

Each person’s face is unique and includes several distinct features. We have a forehead, two eyes, a nose, mouth, cheeks, and a chin. Our faces distinguish us and make us recognizable. The face is a highly sensitive organ and is easily affected by emotion and our other senses.

The shape of your face is determined by the bone structure of your skull. The shape of your face changes over time. For instance, healthy babies typically have very fat cheeks that diminish as they grow. As people continue to age and develop, their cheekbones become more prominent.

 

Vocabulary

  • face — the part of the head containing the eyes, nose, and mouth.
  • feature — a part of something. A facial feature is a part of the face such as the eyes, nose, or chin.
  • trace — to draw following a line.
  • mirror — a smooth surface that shows an image of whatever is in front of it.
  • reflection — an image that bounces off an image or subject.
  • self-portrait — a description or portrayal of oneself, especially a painting.

 

Lesson Tips

- You will need to use permanent markers for this activity that will stain clothing and skin. Have the children wear smocks.

- You may want to prop the children’s mirrors against a heavy object or tape them to an easel or wall to make it easier for the children to see.

 

Books

 - From Head to Toe by Eric Carle

- Marvelous Me: Inside and Out by Lisa Bullard

- We’re Different, We’re the Same by Bob Kates

- Parts by Ted Arnold

- What I Like About Me! by Allia Zobel Nolan

Important Legal Disclosures and Information

*While we believe that the books and resources recommended may be of value to you, keep in mind that these are suggestions only and you must do your own due diligence to determine whether the materials are appropriate and suitable for your use. PNC has no sponsorship or endorsement agreement with the authors or publishers of the materials listed. 

**There are currently no Common Core Standards for pre-k, but these lessons are aligned as closely as possible to capture the requirements and meet the goals of Common Core Standards. However, these lessons were neither reviewed or approved by the National Governors Association Center for Best Practices or the Council of Chief State School Officers, which together are the owners and developers of the Common Core State Standards.